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Josh Mobaraki is the brains behind Moving Recordings, a mobile recording studio based on the Isle of Wight. We had a quick chat about his lockdown experience so far.

Interview by Megan Stisted

 

Hi Josh, how are you doing in these strange times?
Hi! I’m fine thanks. Living out my introvert dreams before the doom comes.

 

Can you tell us a bit about how Moving Recordings works as a mobile recording service?

Yeah! So the artist(s) and I will have a discussion about what sorta spaces are available to us, I’ll scope the places out to make sure they’re going to work if we choose them, and then book a date in the planner and just go for it. Although I’m able to do entire projects on location, we will often just record the things that are going to really benefit from the acoustics (or sometimes just the vibe) of the space we’ve chosen, and then do the rest from my home where we can chain-drink cups of tea and be a bit more comfortable. 

 

Where can we listen to some examples of your work?

You can follow me on instagram to find links to new releases, vids from sessions, and generally what I’m up to @moving_recordings

What projects have you been working on recently?

Rory Ian has an album coming out that we’ve spent about a year on. We did three EP’s in a year, then he told me he wanted to do an album and we just had to go BIG. We’re all really proud and excited to get it into the world. Your boy Jack Barnes (Ventnor Exchange’s former Apprentice) has just released ‘Down & Out’ on Spotify and everywhere else you’d expect – it’s this gloomy, slo-mo punk rock record that was really fun to work on. We actually recorded the drums at Pinfield Pine Studio, and James there played em for us too. What a hero.

How has lockdown impacted you – have you been able to work remotely?

Although I can take on mix projects, almost all recording sessions have stopped. Some have had to pause, others will be able to be finished up through Zoom video call sessions where the artist likes the idea. I’ve found other ways to keep doing my thing too, but I’m looking forward to making records and hanging out with new artists as soon as we safely can.

How is lockdown affecting your productivity as a producer?
I’m doing all the stuff I wanted to do but didn’t have time for. If it was winter time I’d probably just be in a snack cave hibernating but it’s been nice and sunny which really helps. One thing I’m doing is a new branch of the studio that’s purely for computer based music like pop/hip hop/dance etc. I’ve been making demos and my girlfriend’s been painting bob ross style pictures so I’ve been picking one for each song and posting them together @tra.shpalace – it’s fun.

 

And lastly, what album would you recommend we check out as an example of great production work?

22, A Million by Bon Iver

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